Frequently Asked Questions

What kind of milk do you use to make your yogurt?

All our yogurt products begin with whole milk from Hudson Valley Fresh, a dairy farmer partnership dedicated to sustainable agriculture and to preserving the dairy farming tradition of New York’s Hudson River Valley

Learn more about Hudson Valley Fresh.

How can I recycle my jars or whey bottles?

By contacting us DIRECTLY.

Most of your recycled jars go to other small businesses (candle-makers; teachers; musicians; etc.) so it’s all warm and fuzzy feelings all around.

Where can I find the nutrition information for your products?

The simple truth is that we have not run a laboratory nutritional analysis on our yogurt so we will to give you a bit of an explanation on how it’s made and what goes into it. Please keep in mind that this is a hand-made artisanal product that is different from batch to batch.

We are still a very small company, open only a little over a year here in NYC. The FDA has an exception for small batch producers to run the laboratory results. They do allow companies to guesstimate what the calorie count is, but we refuse to do this speculation and instead give you the information so you can see if this is a right fit for you.

We only use whole milk and probiotic cultures to make our yogurt — that’s it! We do not add any cream or starches. Our milk is pure whole milk sourced from a Hudson Valley co-op of family farmers (Hudson Valley Fresh). There is about 10-12oz of milk that goes into making one jar of yogurt.

Before we got started, we experimented with the probiotics and the incubation temperatures to make the yogurt naturally thick. Each batch is handmade and will have slight variations (e.g. we pour the Sour Cherry and the Mulberries in by hand). There is roughly one ounce of fruit in each jar.

This should give you a good estimate. We have noticed that milk can change over seasons–winter milk for example is naturally creamier than summertime milk and I would guess the nutritional information varies as well. We are sorry that we can’t be more exact — we hope you take comfort in the fact that you are having a wholesome very simple yogurt.

Do you ever give tours of your facility?

No.

Is your yogurt kosher?

We use 100 percent Hudson Valley Fresh milk, which is certified by KOF-K Kosher Supervision. However, our production facilities are not certified kosher at this time.

How come your yogurt costs more than Fage or Chobani?

We make our yogurt entirely by hand using high-quality, meticulously sourced ingredients in an unfathomably time- and labor-intensive process. If you were to stop by the factory at two in the morning you’d see us merrily whisking yogurt and spooning sour cherry preserves into jars, one at a time. You may also hear us listening to Britney Spears or Googoosh.

What's all this fuss about Yogurt Whey?

When we strain our beloved yogurt as we do, we are left with a natural by-product called “whey”. This whey is almost neon green in color, it’s THAT pure — there isn’t a drop of cloudy milk solids in our whey, so, zero fat. And just like yogurt, it is chock full of probiotics and calcium. Now, back home, we used to clamour over this “yogurt water” for its hydrating gulps; but now we have quite a bit of it on our hands and people aren’t as familiar with it or what to do with it.

Our family just drinks it. Straight up; but we are Middle Eastern, we love the taste of tangy yogurt. What we didn’t realize are the myriad of uses folks are finding for the whey. We’re not chefs, but we are lucky enough to now be in a city where food is a religion. Some of the ideas that have blown us away:

  • Smoothies
  • Marinating meats
  • Aid in digestion (especially from our pregnant mammas)
  • Post-workout hydration (“Nature’s Gatorade”)

In addition to it being delicious, nutritious and multi-dimensional, finding a home for the whey is also socially responsible for us to do. As Jeffery Steingarten pointed out in his article in July 2014 VOGUE, yogurt whey can have a very serious environmental impact if disposed of incorrectly by releasing so many probiotics into the ecosystem. Now, we’re a tiny company — but we take this seriously. Ok, we take everything seriously, but we really believe in this by-product and will continue making some noise in letting you know about it.

Have a Question?

Please get in touch.